Articles in the category Communities (271)

The Yakans are concentrated in Tipo-tipo , Lamitan, Sumisip, and Tuburan in the Basilan Island of ARMM. There are also scattered populations on the islands of Sakol, Malanipa, and Tumalutad east of the Zamboanga Peninsula. The word Yakan means “Dayak Origin,” as they are believed to be descendants of the Orang Dyaks or Tagihamas of eastern Indonesia.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Lamitan, Tuburan, Yakan
The Waray inhabit the islands of Samar and Biliran, and the eastern section of Leyte in the Eastern Visayas Region. The Waray language belongs to the Visayan language family and is related to Cebuano, Hiligaynon, and Masbateño.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Biliran, Samar, Waray
Most Mandarin Tsinoys reside in the Metro Manila area. Their number is relatively small, so that very few Chinese speak Mandarin (Putonghuah or Guoyu). It is also difficult to identify the Mandarin Tsinoys, as many of them speak different Chinese dialects, depending on their social or economic station.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Chinoys, Mandarin, Tsinoy
The descendants of mainland and island Chinese who migrated to the Philippines are collectively called Tsinoys, Chinoys, or Chinese Filipinos. However, they can be divided into three groups by the geographic location and language of their origin: Fujianese, Cantonese, and Mandarin. There are Tsinoy communities in practically all parts of the archipelago.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Chinoys, Fujianese, Tsinoy
The descendants of mainland and island Chinese who migrated to the Philippines are collectively called Tsinoys, Chinoys, or Chinese Filipinos. However, they can be divided into three groups by the geographic location and language of their origin: Fujianese, Cantonese, and Mandarin. There are Tsinoy communities in practically all parts of the archipelago.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Cantonese, Chinoys, Tsinoy
There are coastal, river, and mountain Tiruray clans, each of which has variations in dialect. In fact, Tiruray is a combination of tiru (“place of origin, birth, or residence”) and ray (from daya, meaning “upper part of a stream or river”). Their language, another distinct ethnolinguistic group, is structurally related to those of the Malayo-Polynesian family but is unintelligible even to their immediate neighbors.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: clans, dialect, Tiruray
Also known as Batangan Taubuid and Fanawbuid, the Western Tawbuid are found in Sablayan and Calintaan in Occidental Mindoro, and Bongabong in Oriental Mindoro. Western Tawbuid is believed to be the only Philippine language without glottal phonemes, having neither /h/ or /?/. It is also spoken by the Bangon Mangyans. A recent survey placed the number of Western Tawbuid speakers at more than 6,000.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
The dominant ethnic group in the Sulu archipelago because of their political and religious institutions, the Tausug occupy Jolo, Indanan, Siasi, and Patikul in Sulu (ARMM). There are also scattered settlements in Zamboanga del Sur and Cotabato, and all the way to Malaysia, which has an estimated Tausug population of more than 110,000.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: ethnic, group, Sulu, Tausug
The Tau’t Bato or Taw Batu (“people of the rock”) stay in the Singnapan Basin, a bowl-shaped valley in southwestern Palawan. Their territory has Mt. Mantalingajan to the east and a coast to the west. Tau’t Bato is a small but articulate subgroup of the Palawan tribes. The language is spoken by various groups in the area.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Palawan, Singnapan, Tau't Bato
The Calamian Tagbanwas are primarily located in the northern part of Palawan in the Calamian and Linapacan islands. Interestingly, they do not belong to the Palawanic subgroup, but are directly classified under the Philippine subgroup. This subgroup is known as the Kalamian group, which includes the Agutaynon.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Calamian, Palawan, Tagbanwa
Puerto Princesa, Palawan is the home of the Tagbanwa. Their language may also be known as Aborlan Tagbanwa or even Apurawnon, and is classified under the other Palawanic languages. However, it has some lexical similarities with Cuyonon, a Bisayan language. Tagbanwas are also said to have their own script.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: Palawan, Tagbanwa
The Tagalogs are one of the largest and most dominant ethnic groups in the country. Most Tagalogs live outside the National Capital Region, in the provinces of Nueva Ecija, Batangas, Quezon, Cavite, Bulacan, Rizal, Laguna, Tarlac, Zambales, Marinduque, Bataan, and Aurora. Significant Tagalog populations are also found in Mindoro and Palawan. The vast majority are followers of Christianity, most of whom are Roman Catholics.
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Published on 02/03/2018 by Papagei
Categories: Communities, Culture, Documentary
Tags: ethnic, groups, Tagalog